Collins Exhibit

Contributed by David Montgomery

fishing
Fishing Village by Yu

Selections from the art collection of Don and Judy Collins are now on display in the auditorium corridor. The works now hung represent about a fifth of all the Collins pieces. Anne Stone selected works for this exhibit.

The Collinses started their collection in the 1970’s. Don gives credit for his art appreciation to courses he took. Their choice of purchases has been based on esthetics; the selection is just what they enjoy. Much of their work comes from Connecticut and New Jersey, where ships and coastal scenes catch their eyes. Purchases have found an emphasis on pieces found at the Mystic Art Festival in Connecticut. Their collection, focusing on contemporary artists, covers all media.

The Collington exhibit emphasizes water colors. Six of the pieces were painted by renowned artist John A. Brunner (1868-1948), a great uncle of Don.

Don and Judy intend to add to their collection, and Mystic will be on their purchase itinerary.

Photo abstraction at Collington

inner_harborThere is some fascinating new art work hanging in the corridor outside the Auditorium.  The works are by resident Dave Montgomery, and many residents will likely enjoy the subjects and their colors and presentation.   Here’s what Dave says about his work:

I have hung a show of photo abstraction in the auditorium corridor.

For many years I have been interested in the artistic line between abstraction and reality. How much is necessary within an abstraction to allow a viewer to identify some reality? And is the identification necessary? In other words, why worry about reality if the strength of the picture is its composition or ordering or color or any other criterion applied to an abstraction?

Back to basics, what determines the success of an abstraction if (in the usual case) there is no attempt to connect with reality? My conversations with abstract artists plus attempts at academic analysis lead me to suggest that a significant approach to an abstraction is to view it as a whole. Do not, according to this approach, overly analyze interrelationships nor positions within the picture; just look with open eyes at the whole picture.

However, when I introduce the possibility of a connection with reality, additional options add to the mix in analysis and appreciation. With any positive chance in viewing the result, the observer is able to see the original reality and how that is displayed. The depiction is in itself an artistic endeavor giving more options. I propose that reality within abstraction adds to the possibility for appreciation.

If you visit the third-floor meting room (next to apartment 351), you can see a similar effect with different execution. Look for the building front in Cairo, Illinois.

Other styles and directions are on my website .