Category Archives: Works in Progress

Collington Corridor Artists

Fabric Art by Jacob Kijne

Every few months the corridors of Collington’s main building are the site for a new exhibit of art work done by residents. These shows will be featured on the website as they occur.   This summer, one corridor is the site of a show of fabric art by resident Jacob Kijne.  

Jacob, an irrigation engineer and soil scientist, started creating fabric art when he was living and working in Lahore, Pakistan.   He bought a sewing machine, and had his secretary translate the manual from Urdo.  Inspired by the ready availability of local fabrics, he made his first piece, Sunflowers, shown in the exhibit and center below.

When he moved to Sri Lanka to become Research Director of the International Water Management Institute in Colombo, there were more great fabrics available, and also some great scenery that inspired a number of wall hangings.

 

 

In retirement Jacob married for the second time, and spent over a decade consulting on water issues to several developing countries, based first in a small home north of London, and then condos in Washington DC.   Some of the hangings he made during these years are also in the show.

 

Above left is a view of the houses in the Dupont Circle area;  Jacob had a view similar to this from the window of his office/work room in the one-bedroom condo he lived in when first coming to Washington.  Above right is a hanging commissioned by his wife Marian Fuchs (also now a Collington resident);  she wanted something in the colors of the great room of their home in England.  

After some time, the couple moved to a larger condo in the heart of downtown DC.  This home had lots of windows, and not very much wall space.  So Jacob made a series of long, thin wall hangings to display between the tall, thin windows.  Here are some on display in the Collington corridor this summer, show here sideways.

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This wall hanging was made after attending an exhibit at the Textile Museum a few years ago. The show was called Kuba Textiles and the Woven Art of Central Africa.  The mats, blankets and baskets were all done in shades of beige and black or dark brown, and were a feast for the eyes of intricate abstract patterns.. 

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This piece is called ‘Red Squares’.  The fabrics are left-overs from making pillow covers for the new condo ‘great room’.  Most of the textiles came from stores in England and the US, but a few were collected during visits to India.  

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‘Umbrellas’ was inspired by the long escalator at the north entrance to the Dupont Circle metro.  On rainy days riders keep their umbrellas up until they are half way down the escalator and in the metro proper. The bright colors are always a charm on a grey day. 

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Above is part of the wedding quilt shown in full at the start of this article.  When Jacob and Marian married in England in 2004, guests were asked to give as gifts a scrap of fabric to be included in the quilt.  The big center piece was the fabric Jacob used to make his bride a dress for the occasion.

Here are two more hangings from the exhibit.  The first was made in nostalgia for winter, while Jacob was living in the tropics.  

 

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Ten Birds was inspired by a painting by Fred Tomaselli in an exhibition in 2000 in the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Jacob made the hanging 17 years later, so any resemblance is unlikely. A generous donation of fabrics from a fellow resident, stimulated Jacob to finally make the piece.   

 

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Grant and Margaret Bagley Appearing in This Play about Teresa of Avila, Starting July 14 at Greenbelt Arts Center.

This folks, is your chance to see Grant Bagley as an Inquisitor and Margaret as a nun.  You have been warned!  (Review here.)

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Opens July 14, Greenbelt Arts Center

Theresa

by Anthony Ernest Gallo
Directed by Beatrix Whitehall
A guest production from Seventh Street PlayhouseAll Teresa of Avila wants is to open Carmelite convents and attain an elevated state with God. First, she has to deal with a nervous novice, two lusty friars, a nosy Royal mistress, the Church hierarchy, and the Spanish Inquisition. Will she survive?Featuring: Emily Canavan, Renate Wallenberg, Margaret Bagley, Hazel Thurston, George Spence, John Starrels, James McDaniel, Beatrix Whitehall, Grant Bagley, Steve Rosenthal, Sam Simon, and Rodney Ross.

July 15, 15, 21, & 22 at 8PM
July 16 & 23 at 2PM

Ticket prices: $22 General Admission, $20 Students/Seniors/Military, $12 Youth (12 and under with adult)
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Healthcare Expert Resident Grant Bagley’s Presentation (With Colleague) to the Trump Team Last Year

Grant Bagley is a longstanding leader here at Collington with achievements than I can remember, but they include law and medical degrees.  As he explains below, he and a colleague (Wes Chapman) were invited last summer to make presentation to senior Trump staff on how to deal with our healthcare problems.  In the paper below, they put their very best foot forward.

Hey, President Trump,

To fix the Healthcare mess, listen to the dog that didn’t bark!

Dr. Grant Bagley & Wes Chapman

July 4, 2017

Preface: This is the first in an occasional series of articles looking at selected healthcare policy issues best addressed by the famous conundrum of the “Dog that didn’t bark” in the 1892 collection of short stories, Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The story “Silver Blaze,” is a mystery about the disappearance of a famous racehorse and the murder of the horse’s trainer. Sherlock Homes solves the mystery in part by recognizing that no one he spoke to in his investigation remarked that they had heard barking from the watchdog during the night – the absence of the expected is the clue to the mystery. We propose, and hope to convince the reader, that to solve the mess unfolding around the repeal/collapse of ACA (Obamacare), don’t listen to the howls of partisans and media. Instead look for policy solutions in the silence – where the dogs don’t bark.

In the late spring of last year, just before the Republican convention, we were invited to present to the Trump campaign (at the Cabinet Secretary level) regarding the best healthcare policy for the Republic under a Republican Administration. This was a treat to put together, and a fun presentation to make – it’s not often that you can imagine a White House beholden to nobody, with a clear but inchoate mandate for change. And we were proposing the framework to contain and direct that change – for over $3.0 trillion in annual expenditures.

Our initial premise was pretty simple, US healthcare is the most expensive among comparable nations, with the lowest quality. In simple terms, we spend 17% of our GDP for healthcare, and rank dead last among 11 comparable countries in terms of quality. Our suggestion was pretty simple, let’s take a look at what these other folks are doing and learn from it.

Here is the full Barking-Bagley paper.  Simple, crisp, clean and right.

 

 

Collington Works In Progress #1: Dave Montgomery Show Opening

One of the amazing things about Collington is how many of us have one form or another ongoing “work in progress.”  We will make a point of sharing information about them.

Dave Montgomery, a new resident in the 5000 cluster, shares this announcement of the opening of his new exhibition of digital composition in Frederick Maryland:

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Collingtonians at the Greebelt Arts Center

Grant Bagley shares information about two productions involving Collingtonians.

Note that both of these plays have Collinton residents in the cast.  Collington is unable to provide a bus to the Agatha Christie play.  If there is sufficient interest perhaps we could arrange carpools or rent a bus for the June 26 Sunday matinee.  The Eaton Woman will have a bus for the Sunday July 17 matinee.  The Eaton Woman is by the same playwright as the Springfield Boys, the Abraham Lincoln play that many Collington residents attended last year.

OPENING FRIDAY!
THE HOLLOW
Written by Agatha Christie, Directed by Rick Starkweather
Guest Production from Thunderous Productions

An unhappy game of romantic follow-the-leader explodes into murder one weekend at The Hollow, home of Sir Henry and Lucy Angkatell. Dr. Cristow is at the center of the trouble when his mistress Henrietta, ex-mistress Veronica, and wife Gerda,  simultaneously arrive at The Hollow. Also visiting are Edward (who is in love with Henrietta) and Midge (who loves Edward). Veronica ardently desires to marry Cristow and succeeds in reopening their affair but is unable to get him to divorce his wife. Veronica unwisely states that if she cannot have him, no one shall. Within five minutes Cristow is dead. Nearly everyone has a motive and most had the opportunity. Enter Inspector Colquhoun and Sergeant Penny to solve the crime.

Featuring: Christina Wilharm, Grant Bagley, Trix Whitehall, Heather (Martin) Kork, Jon Marget, Eric Kruzikas, Margaret Bagley, Pimmie Juntranggur, Brian Lewandowski, Devonna Burrowes, Sherry Lasster, Jeff Robert

June 17, 18, 24, 25 – Fridays and Saturdays at 8:00
June 19 & 26Sunday Matinees at 2:00Ticket prices: $20 General Admission, $16 Students/Seniors/Military,
$12 Youth (12 and under with adult)
Buy Tickets

The Presidential Election was More Barbaric in 1828 than 2016

THE EATON WOMAN

By Anthony Ernest Gallo
Directed By Beatrix Whitehall
Guest Production From The Seventh Street Playhouse

Friday, July 8, Saturday, July 9,
Friday, July 15, Saturday, July 16 at 8:00 PM
Sunday, July 10 and Sunday, July 17 at 2:00 PM

The Eaton Woman is not well suited for people who hate gossip.   But the play dispels any notion that Washington was once a kinder, gentler city.  This historically based two- act dramedy is all about morals, adultery, lies, deception, women’s roles in Washington Society, the quasi downfall of the Jackson Administration, and the most beautiful woman in Washington history.  Others say the most immoral and abrasive.
Featuring: Tarpley Long, Samuel A. Simon, Miles Benson, Christie Starley, John Starrels, Jon Marget, Margaret Bagley,  Rod Ross, Johnna Leary, Grant Bagley, Charles Schoonover, Charles Schoonover, Christie Starley, Lindsay Williams, Penny Martin

$20 adult, $16 senior/student/military, $14 youth

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