Category Archives: Works in Progress

CAPITAL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER GROUNDBREAKING EVENT AT LARGO TOWN CENTER: NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Contributed by Peter Fielding

Last Thursday was both memorable and important for our Collington community.

After a long period of discussion, lasting some ten years, the University of Maryland and our Maryland state agencies have partnered to create a new state of the art Medical Center less than two miles from our Collington campus.

Under the very entertaining and skilled Master of Ceremonies, Charlene Dukes (President, Prince Georges Community College), a dozen speakers had variations on the same themes: partnerships; recognition of local healthcare needs; the politics of money; and the duration of what was called a “spirited negotiation” which was needed to reach ultimate agreement.

Both well-established representatives and those seeking higher office were on the program and most of them spoke: Seamon, Moore, Reece, Chrencik, Hogan, Cardin, Van Hollen, Hoyer, Brown, Davis, Busch, Miller, and Baker.

However, it was the last speaker, The Honorable Rushern L. Baker III, PG County Executive, who had been the major driving force keeping the vision moving forward who spoke for the majority. He was quiet, humble, sincere, and clearly personally moved by the fact that the people of our region will now be better served when the first phase of the Medical Center, and some of the related retail and office developments, come on line within 3 – 4 years. Baker was given a standing ovation by the 450 guests (which included a small contingent from Collington). All the guests were clearly very engaged; lots of animated chatter; lots of handshakes; and quite a lot of hugs.

It was a good day for a future which promises to meet some of Collington’s core health needs.   So very refreshing.

Hospital details when all phases complete:

  • Main Tower: 11 levels; 2 rooftop helipads, 595,744 sq. ft.
  • Acute care licensed beds (private): 205
  • Adult Observation/Short Stay beds: 20
  • ER treatment bays: 45
  • Operating rooms: 8

Core Programs & Specialty Centers:

  • Level II Trauma Center
  • Level III Neonatal Intensive Care
  • Cardiac STEMI/Cardiac Surgery Center
  • Designated Stroke Center
  • Cancer Program
  • Critical Care Medicine
  • Emergency Services
  • Neurosciences
  • Orthopedics
  • Women’s Services

Richard Zorza’s Legal Blog Gets ABA Award

The American Bar Association Journal now does a Web 100 list honoring “the best of lawyers and the law on the web.”  For whatever it is worth, they have included my (Richard’s) Access to Justice blog this year on their list. Here is the link to the blog itself.

Quoting the blog, they describe it as follows:

“We define access to justice broadly to include innovations in courts, the bar, legal aid and community that make it easier for people to obtain access to justice institutions, and to just results within those institutions.” Posts cover a broad range of subjects, including access to counsel, foreclosures, self-service, law schools and technology.

Remember, all my blogs are listed here.

To whet your appetites, here is the begining of the list of topics covered.

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I know I am not alone in wanting to hear more about other resident’s milestones.

Collington Corridor Artists

Fabric Art by Jacob Kijne

Every few months the corridors of Collington’s main building are the site for a new exhibit of art work done by residents. These shows will be featured on the website as they occur.   This summer, one corridor is the site of a show of fabric art by resident Jacob Kijne.  

Jacob, an irrigation engineer and soil scientist, started creating fabric art when he was living and working in Lahore, Pakistan.   He bought a sewing machine, and had his secretary translate the manual from Urdo.  Inspired by the ready availability of local fabrics, he made his first piece, Sunflowers, shown in the exhibit and center below.

When he moved to Sri Lanka to become Research Director of the International Water Management Institute in Colombo, there were more great fabrics available, and also some great scenery that inspired a number of wall hangings.

 

 

In retirement Jacob married for the second time, and spent over a decade consulting on water issues to several developing countries, based first in a small home north of London, and then condos in Washington DC.   Some of the hangings he made during these years are also in the show.

 

Above left is a view of the houses in the Dupont Circle area;  Jacob had a view similar to this from the window of his office/work room in the one-bedroom condo he lived in when first coming to Washington.  Above right is a hanging commissioned by his wife Marian Fuchs (also now a Collington resident);  she wanted something in the colors of the great room of their home in England.  

After some time, the couple moved to a larger condo in the heart of downtown DC.  This home had lots of windows, and not very much wall space.  So Jacob made a series of long, thin wall hangings to display between the tall, thin windows.  Here are some on display in the Collington corridor this summer, show here sideways.

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This wall hanging was made after attending an exhibit at the Textile Museum a few years ago. The show was called Kuba Textiles and the Woven Art of Central Africa.  The mats, blankets and baskets were all done in shades of beige and black or dark brown, and were a feast for the eyes of intricate abstract patterns.. 

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This piece is called ‘Red Squares’.  The fabrics are left-overs from making pillow covers for the new condo ‘great room’.  Most of the textiles came from stores in England and the US, but a few were collected during visits to India.  

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‘Umbrellas’ was inspired by the long escalator at the north entrance to the Dupont Circle metro.  On rainy days riders keep their umbrellas up until they are half way down the escalator and in the metro proper. The bright colors are always a charm on a grey day. 

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Above is part of the wedding quilt shown in full at the start of this article.  When Jacob and Marian married in England in 2004, guests were asked to give as gifts a scrap of fabric to be included in the quilt.  The big center piece was the fabric Jacob used to make his bride a dress for the occasion.

Here are two more hangings from the exhibit.  The first was made in nostalgia for winter, while Jacob was living in the tropics.  

 

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Ten Birds was inspired by a painting by Fred Tomaselli in an exhibition in 2000 in the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Jacob made the hanging 17 years later, so any resemblance is unlikely. A generous donation of fabrics from a fellow resident, stimulated Jacob to finally make the piece.   

 

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Grant and Margaret Bagley Appearing in This Play about Teresa of Avila, Starting July 14 at Greenbelt Arts Center.

This folks, is your chance to see Grant Bagley as an Inquisitor and Margaret as a nun.  You have been warned!  (Review here.)

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Opens July 14, Greenbelt Arts Center

Theresa

by Anthony Ernest Gallo
Directed by Beatrix Whitehall
A guest production from Seventh Street PlayhouseAll Teresa of Avila wants is to open Carmelite convents and attain an elevated state with God. First, she has to deal with a nervous novice, two lusty friars, a nosy Royal mistress, the Church hierarchy, and the Spanish Inquisition. Will she survive?Featuring: Emily Canavan, Renate Wallenberg, Margaret Bagley, Hazel Thurston, George Spence, John Starrels, James McDaniel, Beatrix Whitehall, Grant Bagley, Steve Rosenthal, Sam Simon, and Rodney Ross.

July 15, 15, 21, & 22 at 8PM
July 16 & 23 at 2PM

Ticket prices: $22 General Admission, $20 Students/Seniors/Military, $12 Youth (12 and under with adult)
Buy Tickets

Healthcare Expert Resident Grant Bagley’s Presentation (With Colleague) to the Trump Team Last Year

Grant Bagley is a longstanding leader here at Collington with achievements than I can remember, but they include law and medical degrees.  As he explains below, he and a colleague (Wes Chapman) were invited last summer to make presentation to senior Trump staff on how to deal with our healthcare problems.  In the paper below, they put their very best foot forward.

Hey, President Trump,

To fix the Healthcare mess, listen to the dog that didn’t bark!

Dr. Grant Bagley & Wes Chapman

July 4, 2017

Preface: This is the first in an occasional series of articles looking at selected healthcare policy issues best addressed by the famous conundrum of the “Dog that didn’t bark” in the 1892 collection of short stories, Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The story “Silver Blaze,” is a mystery about the disappearance of a famous racehorse and the murder of the horse’s trainer. Sherlock Homes solves the mystery in part by recognizing that no one he spoke to in his investigation remarked that they had heard barking from the watchdog during the night – the absence of the expected is the clue to the mystery. We propose, and hope to convince the reader, that to solve the mess unfolding around the repeal/collapse of ACA (Obamacare), don’t listen to the howls of partisans and media. Instead look for policy solutions in the silence – where the dogs don’t bark.

In the late spring of last year, just before the Republican convention, we were invited to present to the Trump campaign (at the Cabinet Secretary level) regarding the best healthcare policy for the Republic under a Republican Administration. This was a treat to put together, and a fun presentation to make – it’s not often that you can imagine a White House beholden to nobody, with a clear but inchoate mandate for change. And we were proposing the framework to contain and direct that change – for over $3.0 trillion in annual expenditures.

Our initial premise was pretty simple, US healthcare is the most expensive among comparable nations, with the lowest quality. In simple terms, we spend 17% of our GDP for healthcare, and rank dead last among 11 comparable countries in terms of quality. Our suggestion was pretty simple, let’s take a look at what these other folks are doing and learn from it.

Here is the full Barking-Bagley paper.  Simple, crisp, clean and right.