Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Resident Association Officer Candidates

At a meeting on September 25, Joyce Garrison, speaking on behalf of the Nominating Committee, introduced a slate of candidates to head up the RA Council starting next month.  The candidates are, from left to right in the picture below:
Lois Brown for President
Nadine Hathaway for First VP
Sue Regen for Second VP
(Joyce Garrison)
Judy Collins (returning) for Secretary
Linda Ewald (returning) for Treasurer
The community will be voting on the candidates in the Clocktower all day on October 4, and the Annual Meeting of the Council will be at 1:30 pm in the Auditorium on October 5.   We need a quorum to attend, so be sure to be there to welcome the new officers!
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Photo abstraction at Collington

inner_harborThere is some fascinating new art work hanging in the corridor outside the Auditorium.  The works are by resident Dave Montgomery, and many residents will likely enjoy the subjects and their colors and presentation.   Here’s what Dave says about his work:

I have hung a show of photo abstraction in the auditorium corridor.

For many years I have been interested in the artistic line between abstraction and reality. How much is necessary within an abstraction to allow a viewer to identify some reality? And is the identification necessary? In other words, why worry about reality if the strength of the picture is its composition or ordering or color or any other criterion applied to an abstraction?

Back to basics, what determines the success of an abstraction if (in the usual case) there is no attempt to connect with reality? My conversations with abstract artists plus attempts at academic analysis lead me to suggest that a significant approach to an abstraction is to view it as a whole. Do not, according to this approach, overly analyze interrelationships nor positions within the picture; just look with open eyes at the whole picture.

However, when I introduce the possibility of a connection with reality, additional options add to the mix in analysis and appreciation. With any positive chance in viewing the result, the observer is able to see the original reality and how that is displayed. The depiction is in itself an artistic endeavor giving more options. I propose that reality within abstraction adds to the possibility for appreciation.

If you visit the third-floor meting room (next to apartment 351), you can see a similar effect with different execution. Look for the building front in Cairo, Illinois.

Other styles and directions are on my website .

The Full Memorial Day Photo

I have used Willard Colby’s wonderful Memorial week Regatta photo as our new header on this website.  Many may want to see the full photo, so here it is:

memday

A Brief Memory of Justice Marshall

The announcement of the film “Marshall“, to be shown in the Collington auditorium on Monday, reminded me of the one time I was lucky enough to even be in the same room with him

When I was in law school, our teacher Tony Lewis, arranged for us to hear a Supreme Court argument, and then to meet with the Justice.

Before we met Marshall, we were reminded that we should never, ever, ever, mention the pending case, or the argument, with him. So Marshall, inevitably, with his impishness and lack of respect for decorum, walked into the room and asked, “So that was a pretty bad argument, was not it?”  (He was right, of course.)

The most important think I remember, however, is that he talked with some deeply felt irritation at the superficiality of the press, recounting specifically when a journalist asked to see him when he was Solicitor General, and how so he prepared with every possible question — and the jornalist came in with “Could you speak at my son’s graduation.”  As we were leaving, I said something to Tony Lewis about how Marshall could see the press clearly and yet still be such a powerful advocate for the First Amendment.  I will remember Tony Lewis’ simple reply all my life.  “That is greatness.”

Marshall told some hysterical anecdotes, such as the time he espied his wife in the gallery watching an abortion case, and had a US marshal deliver a note that said something like:  “Why are you worrying about abortion?” and her sending back the reply “May I remind you that it takes two to tango.”

A great man who never forgot his humanity — and ours.

P.S. Nancy Lively just emailed me  legal bio of Marshall, adding her own personal note:

The law case cited in Anne Arundel County (our neighboring county to Prince George’s) was won by Marshall in 1939.  The man bringing the suit for equal pay for Black teachers was the father of a close friend who is also the pianist in our church.  Her mom and dad were both school principals when we moved to Annapolis in 1968 and we got  to know Valerie in 1972 if memory serves me. This victory was the first in the USA to gain equal pay across race lines and 14 other states quickly followed suit. An elementary school where Mr. Mills was principal is named for him.  Thurgood Marshall made a big impression in Annapolis and is memorialized by a magnificent statue in the most prominent location in town with adoring children across from him also as statues looking with love at his statue. It is located near the place where he often argued cases.

Every time I see Valerie which is weekly I recall her father, his bravery in bring suit and Marshall for the courageous stands this young lawyer took right before the year I was born.  Nancy Lively

Cleaning Up the Lake

Our Weed warriors took advantage of the temporary lowering of the lake to clean up the perimineter.

Garbage collectors.jpg