Category Archives: Speakers Committee

By No Means the Dog Days: First Class Entertainment at Collington in Early August

contributed by Marian Fuchs

In the first two weeks of August 2018, Collington residents were treated to all kinds of great entertainment.

On one afternoon and two evenings we were treated to a evening of total pleasure:  Summer’s Lease:  Songs, Sonnets and Scenes from the Bard, put on by a cast of dozens from the Drama Committee.  Below are Musical Director, Marilyn Haskel, and Director Tim Sabin, in front of the charming set built by Grant Bagley and Don Collins.

For the production program, including the words of the songs and sonnets, and a background piece by Tim Sabin, click here.

The following week, Glen Johnson introduced the community to one of his former students, Chip Reid, a national correspondent for CBS News, speaking on From Obama to Trump:  How Life has Changed for Political Reporters.  This telegenic and fluent speaker charmed his packed audience, and aroused a series of interesting questions that kept us for much longer than expected.

There were two excellent and very different concerts.   In the Sunday afternoon series, the audience enjoyed listening to the Transatlantic Duo of Alexander Paperney (balalaika) and Vladimir Friedman (guitar and vocals).   Their music varied from Mozart and Bizet to Russian folk music, with tango music from Brazil in between.

Sponsored by our two departing summer interns, there was a concert in the short Beethoven series given by some highly talented young musicians from U Maryland.  It was given to a packed house on a Friday afternoon.

Above are Molly Jones, Cello, Andrew Welch, Piano, and guest player, Lewis Gilmore on Clarinet.   The three together played a Brahms trio;  Molly and Andrew together gave us some delightful variations by Beethoven on a tune written by Handel, and finally a Sonata for cello and piano by the same composer.

The young woman in black on the right was introduced only as “Ria”, and is one of the two replacement music interns Collington will be hosting from September.

Residents who braved to off-and-on-again rain one Saturday got to enjoy the Doxoe jazz music of the Kollington Kats, while sipping cocktails in the courtyard or Clocktower.  Below a picture of some of the Kats swinging at an earlier gig.

Good News!

By Marian Fuchs

It’s always fun to meet the children of fellow-residents.  Mostly we see them in the dining room for weekend meals.  But sometimes we get to hear from them directly, and that’s even better.   Later this week we’re going to have the chance to hear from the Florini’s two daughters, both of whom are following illustrious careers.   Their talk title suggests that we’re going to hear something positive — just what we need right around now!   sisters3a

 

The Slides From the Brilliant Presentation on Modern Gerontology

Here are the full slides from the presentation by Dr. Bellantoni: Aging and Health Care.

Just as a teaser, here is one slide.

Whatever path we take, let’s look back at this in five years and say, this way of thinking is what has inspired us.

 

Aging and Health Care 9.21.003

 

 

 

Washington Post obituary of Warren Unna

Below is the Washington Post Obituary for Warren Unna:

Warren Unna, journalist and Post bureau chief in India, dies at 93

Warren Unna, a Washington Post correspondent in India who later became Washington correspondent for the Statesman, an English-language newspaper based in Kolkata, died Feb. 9 at a retirement community in Mitchellville, Md. He was 93.

The cause was congestive heart failure, said a friend, Marea Hatziolos Grant.

Mr. Unna covered national news after joining The Post in 1952. His aspirations were to cover South Asia, where he had served with the Army during World War II.

In lieu of a Post bureau there, Mr. Unna made a specialty of writing about Asian affairs from Washington by cultivating sources at embassies and international organizations.

Mr. Unna was bureau chief in New Delhi from 1965 to 1967, then returned to cover national affairs in Washington. He was one of many journalists whose names appeared on President Richard M. Nixon’s enemies list in the early 1970s, presumably for his reporting on the Vietnam War for The Post and for a short-lived public television program, “Newsroom.”

He joined the Statesman in the early 1970s and remained with that publication for approximately the next two decades. He also contributed to other publications.

Warren Walter Unna was born in San Francisco on Sept. 14, 1923. He graduated in 1943 from the University of California at Berkeley with a degree in international relations. He worked at the San Francisco Chronicle before coming to The Post.

In the late 1950s, he traveled widely as an Institute of Current World Affairs fellow, for which he studied the Non-Aligned Movement countries during the Cold War.

He wrote a memoir, “Letters From America” (1994), and in retirement did consulting for the Westinghouse and McClatchy media companies. He was a member of the Metropolitan Club in Washington.

His marriage to Louise Thompson was annulled. Survivors include a stepsister.

(Copyright Washington Post 2017)

This website has commissioned a more detailed appreciation, which we look forward to publishing in the future.

In the interim, readers may find interesting this article from the Collingtonian of March 2012.

Unna Relates His Experiences in Asia

The March 21 guest speaker was no guest at all, but 12-year (almost) Collingtonian Warren Unna, who spoke of his experiences with celebrities from presidents to foreign heads of state while he was a newspaper reporter.

Warren graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and rst worked for the San Francisco Chronicle. The Institute of Current World Affairs gave him the opportunity to travel- study around the world for a year. He concentrated on how countries achieved neutrality.

He then obtained employment at the Wash- ington Post because, he said, the chronicle’s management didn’t want to pay the Newspaper Guild’s required salary for a senior reporter. For the Post, he primarily covered Asia. Warren rattled off a list of famous people whom he had met, beginning with then past-president Herbert Hoover who was chairing the Hoover Commis- sion for President Dwight Eisenhower. He found Hoover quite pleasant to deal with.

Not so Ike, who did not seem to like doing press conferences and kept the press at bay when he traveled. On the other hand, a John Kennedy press conference was “just a joy.” Lyn- don Johnson, who believed that “every man had his price,” was the best politician of the presi- dents, he thought. “He got his votes,” Warren said

Warren attributed his success in conducting interviews to being friendly and listening to the person being interviewed. It is also important to sit so as to make eye contact, he said. In Indonesia, he managed to obtain a difficult interview by learning that it was the local custom to not turn away any visitor who arrived in the late afternoon. In his travels about Asia, Warren recounted many experiences and listed the many prominent people he met: Indian Prime Minister Jawaharial Nehru who answered 17 questions for him, thereby generating two major stories with Warren’s byline; the King of Bhutan who sought advice on educating his son; an Indian health minister who walked briskly back and forth in a garden while he trailed her trying to take notes; President Lee Kuan Yew of the Republic of Singapore with whom he argued about the Viet Nam War; the daughter of a Japanese Prime Minister for whom a gift of stockings got him an interview and a nice meal in a restaurant; the wife of the president of South Korea who tried to nd eligible ladies for him to marry; Madame Chiang Kai-shek whom he watched squirm as her support from the “China Lobby” in America dried- up and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who rejected his questions.

Of particular interest to residents was his accompanying G. Mennen “Soapy” Williams, then assistant secretary of state for African Affairs, on a whirlwind tour of 16 countries in 31 days for President Kennedy. In Addis Abbaba, Ethiopia, he met and lunched with Collingtonians Bill and Nancy McGhee, who were then stationed there. He apologized to them (they were in the audience) for impertinently asking if they “always ate that well.”

(Copyright Collington Residents Association 2012)

A Historian Treat For Us Wednesday Evening (the 14th) — George W. Liebman

Paul Carrington has recruited another excellent speaker for us, to be heard today or tomorrow, depending on whether you are reading this on Tuesday of Wednesday.  The presentation by George Liebman will be at 7:30 in the Auditorium on this Wednesday.

Liebman’s most recent book, described here by the American Law Institute, is:

The Fall of the House of Speyer: The Story of a Banking Dynasty, was recently published. The work tells the story of the Speyer banking dynasty, one of the largest investment banking firms in the United States in the early 1900s.

Other books by Liebman are:   The Common Law Tradition: A Collective Portrait of Five Legal Scholars; Diplomacy Between the Wars: Five Diplomats and the Shaping of the Modern World; and The Last American Diplomat: John D. Negroponte and His Times, 1960-2010.

A huge range of knowledge.  Should be fascinating.