Category Archives: Operating Committees

Major Rehab Upgrade

As a partial consequences on our long term planning, Collington is making a major upgrade to our rehab services.  The new group that will be providing rehab services is Assisted Rehab.

Here is the schedule of introductions and meetings, which as see, shows a real intent on all sides to build a partnership that reflects our needs down to the individual level.

FOR ALL RESIDENTS

September 15 at 1:30pm – Resident Community Meeting – Auditorium Meet the Leadership of Assisted Rehab

• Overview of company, background and expertise as well as their philosophy on rehabilitation and resident-centered care.

September 19 at 2:30pm – Health Services Coffee Chat – Auditorium

Experience Assisted Rehab’s Philosophy of Care

  • Informal discussion of what residents can expect for the rehabilitation process and the types of services provided
  • A short but energetic example of how to “get moving” and active again

August 31, 2017

September 28 at 3:30pm – Health Center Resident’s Meeting –– Arbor Great Room

Understand Assisted Rehab’s Approach in Meeting the Unique Care Needs of Health Center Residents

  • Overview of company and what benefits it can bring to residents of the health center
  • A short but energetic example of how to “get moving” and active again.

 

October at Various Dates/Times – District Rounds – Various Locations

• Smaller group meetings with each resident housing district to answer additional questions and share more details on the transition and specifics on programming.

FOR HEALTH SERVICES STAFF MEMBERS

September at Various Dates/Times – Staff Meetings

• Meetings with health services team to review final logistics of transition, overview of processes and needs of both Collington and Assisted Rehab

From talking to those who participated in the select5ion process, it seems that we have an energetic, committed, partner, who cares about individuals and innovation.

Above all, this change should make it much easier to integrate approaches that are about life goals, not just vital sign metrics.  We will be seeing more and more changes that mutually reinforce each other.  As a tweetet might say, “EXCITING.”

Watch this space.

 

The Collington Road Warriors — Resurfacing Continues

From our photo correspondent Marian Fuchs, some nice photos and explanation:

This morning the crew have been paving the path behind our house.  I thought you might enjoy seeing some pictures of the men and equipment at work.  It’s precision work, and fun to watch their expertise.

019015028

Here’s a pic of the crew paving behind our house.  I was particularly impressed by the fact that this driver could do his rolling backwards as well as forwards!

Full set:

The Collington Silt Warriors

Wall Pic 3

Karen Boyce launched our reporting on the silt amelioration project with this photo and the below information about the group that is spearheading the work:

The Clean Water Partnership is a Public-Private Partnership (P3) between Prince George’s County and Corvias. The CWP is the first of its kind to design, build, finance, operate and maintain urban stormwater infrastructure to meet MS4 regulatory requirements and is committed to retrofit up to 4,000 impervious acres.

Please visit www.thecleanwaterpartnership.com to learn more about this innovative partnership.

So your investigative team, soil and water expert Jacob Kijne and I, wandered down and gathered more provisional information — and some more photos, about this important work.

The idea is that the incoming silt-laden water is slowed down by the rocks, and drops its load of silt into the area between the inlet and the rocks.  The rocks, by the way, are kept in “cages” of PVC coated cable, so the containers will not rot.  Every few years, the trapped silt can easily then be removed.  The rocks will be much less visible than now, since they should be largely covered by water one water is allowed back into the lake.

Obviously, we can not plant trees directly onto the rocks, but maybe we will be able to think of some ways that we can use the new feature as an opportunity.  Maybe we need a “Lake Group,” just like we have a “Courtyard Group.”  Time for some Collington creativity.  Part of the opportunity is to think about how we can apply the emerging goal and value themes of the strategic planning process to an exploration of the lake’s potential — boat trips for staff kids, sustaining our water?  Educational programs from our experts?  More ideas?  It is perfect that our new horticulturalist will be onboard soon and can help us think about the relationship between our values and our landscape resources.

More photos:

 

 

 

Tool to Invite Patient Engagement May Be Helpful for Retirement Communities

The BMJ (formerly British Medical Journal) has just published, An Invitation to Patient and Family Engaged Care for Consumers: What it is, Why it Matters and How Patients and Families Can Engage.  I think we may find it very helpful here at Collington and in other retirement communities as a way to think about patient engagement and partnership.

This short document, of which I am listed as a co-author, explains the concept of patient engaged care, describes and briefly summarizes the Planetree – National Academy of Medicine framework synthesis of the research into the impact of this approach, and perhaps most importantly, then specifically welcomes and invites patients to become engaged and partnering team members. (Note that my blog, attempting to summarize the very rich and detailed original Planetree-NAM paper, into which I had some input, is here.)

The BMJ response includes our offered model “Dear Patients & Families” letter, which could be used generally by medical institutions to explain, welcome and support full engaged participation.

For example, it references and summarizes the research as follows:

The good news is that research shows that patient and family engaged care leads to better relationships between you and your healthcare providers. It helps keeps patients safe. It reduces healthcare costs and keeps people from being unnecessarily readmitted to the hospital. Patient and family engaged care makes healthcare staff feel more connected to the work they do, which makes for a better experience for everyone.

Some of its specific invitations and suggestions to patients are as follows:

  • On your next visit to your healthcare provider, ask them if they have seen the framework for patient and family engaged care. If not, direct them here: https://nam.edu/pfec.
  • Ask your healthcare provider if there is a way for you to be involved in improving care. For example, ask if they have a patient-family advisory council.
  • Ask to be part of the organization’s leadership or government team. Ask if patients are included as board members, for example.
  • Ask to be with your loved one at all times, if they want that. Question why there are restrictions to visiting patients. If having visitors is not beneficial to your healing process, enlist the support of your care team to set parameters for guests.
  • Ask that a Care Partner or family member be present and engaged for all conversations about your health.
  • State your feelings. They matter just as much as your physical condition.
  • Get involved in research. Ask about how your condition is being studied and how you can help.
  • Let your care team know how you like to receive information.
  • Ask to see and contribute to your medical record. If you don’t understand what you read in your medical record, ask questions until you do.
  • Tell your care provider what your health goals are – in your own terms (for instance, being able to walk up a flight of stairs, being able to play with your grandchildren without getting winded, etc.)
  • Come to doctor’s appointments prepared. Bring a notepad with questions, your medication list and any other pertinent personal healthcare information.
  • Create a medical biography about yourself. What conditions and medications have you had in the past? What are you currently experiencing? What are your goals for the future?
  • Act like you belong. Be a teammate, not a subject.

I think the last one, “Act like you belong. Be a teammate, not a subject,” sums the whole approach up perfectly.

I very much hope that medical institutions will want to include this letter in their intake, on-boarding process for new patients, and to encourage staff to use its suggestions as a framework for discussions with patients about a team approach and its specifics. It, together with the underlying NAM framework, could also be an excellent too for staff training at all levels on how not just to have an engagement discussion, but to make all discussions team discussions.

If this approach because a standard in most institutions, then we will truly be on the way way to a greatly improved system.  And the same is true of Collington!

P.S. This post is an edited version of one I did in my Patient Partnering blog.

Marian’s Photo Essay on “Inanimate Animals of Collington: Summer 2017”

Last year we published pictures of some of the inanimate creatures with whom we share our campus. There was an occasional complaint that a given animal had been overlooked, and others seem to have come wandering in, to nestle quietly under some available shade…

The inanimate creatures are as varied as their animate cousins. They have all kinds of different shapes and temperaments. This summer it seems we’ve had quite an influx of calm and slow-moving turtles and dragonflies…

Some creatures are are far more in-your-face assertive…

Some are pale, sleepy, shy or just quiet…

While others are more colorful, but nestled in vegetation…

And some are just happy to be together.

Inan-6.-1jpg

After the publication of the recent batch of photos, we were surprised and delighted to be sent additions — the first three pictures below are by Shirley Denman. We were directed to additional locations by several other residents, and following their guidance, discovered many more. So here are pictures of yet more sweet, serene or slightly sinister creatures, now living silently in the shadows of our cottages.

Nestled among foliage, it was hard to spot these happy cats and this solemn dog. And we might never have known about the magnificent driftwood lion below, if Alice Nicolson hadn’t clued us to its location in the Arbor garden.

i-6-5

The first batch of pictures has inspired another photographer, who is out and about with his camera these days, adding to the collection. Both of us will continue publishing our discoveries as they are uncovered.   Meantime, enjoy a few more…

The owner of the cute critter on the far right (who also owns the watchful heron) says it’s an otter, and no doubt she is right; but to us it looks quite like a meerkat too…

This set ends with (left) something special that its owner calls a ‘prairie Buddha’. The owner of the bird on the right tells us it’s a quail. It’s certainly handsome.

Remember, along with any other outdoor friends we find, images of the inanimate animals living in the corridors of the apartments will be coming later this summer!