Category Archives: Residents Association

Signs of Spring and Easter at Collington

By Marian Fuchs

After weeks of enduring a seemingly never-ending winter, spring finally arrived at the very end of March, in time for a great Easter brunch on April 1 – no fooling! Here’s proof…

Flowers on campus

Easter Bunny  and Ice Sculpture Seafood Bar

Mimosas in the Ivy Lounge and Snacks

Easter Windowsill Creations by the Flower Committee

spring4Forsythia all around Collington

Menu For “The Landing” Bistro, and Report on Left-Overs Experiment

Most people already have a good sense of how very good the cooked to order cooking is in our new “Landing”.

But Joan and I have an additional piece of good news to report.  Yesterday, we could not finish our Veggie Pizza at lunch, so took it home and ate it for dinner.

I do not think I have ever eaten a better cold pizza.  I do not know if it is the ingredients, the speed of the cooking, or what, but it was sensational — and totally digestible, even more me.

Not bad, the core of two meals for two folks for, ultimately, $6.

So, here, now on our webpage, is the full current menu.

Vitalize360 Launching This Week — Meet and Greet Friday in the Game Room

This is the week that our Vitalize 360 program gets its real launch and sign-up opportunity.  A project of Kendal, it provides us Collington residents the opportunity to get a “life coach,” who will help us bring together whatever resources and help to decide what they want to achieve next in our lives.  If one of us does not yet know what this is, our new staffer Kim Rivers will help us figure that out too.  Once a goal is identified, Kim will help pull together the Collington resources, staff and residents, to support the process.

Often this is thought of in traditional medical terms, such as achieving a particular “vital sign” milestone, or getting physically strong enough to, for example, get on a plan to visit grandchildren.

But many of us feel that the most exciting engagements that this makes possible are more intellectual, political, academic, etc.  Dianna Cox, who runs the project, and was here for a great presentation yesterday, gave an example of a man who had decided to challenge his golf club’s men only policy, and did so successfully.  (Other more transformative possibilities might come to mind.)

Tomorrow, Friday March 9 at 10:30 in the Game Room, there will be a meet and greet to get to know  Kim and learn more about the project.

Here is the PowerPoint that Nancy Cox presented.

Here is a short video:

It is important to note that Vitalize 360 is a key pat of our strategic plan, both as a specific element, and as something that will help build culture-transformative energy.

Indeed, a recent article in the Journal of Aging Research and Healthcare, here, concludes:

In this project, COLLAGE [Vilalize at one location] 360, a comprehensive assessment system and wellness coaching program that focuses on prevention and wellness was implemented in one continuing care retirement community. Following completion of two assessment tools through directed conversations with a wellness coach, older adults developed an individualized vitality plan that outlined life goals, supporting goals and action plans for goal achievement. Results from this program suggest engagement in the assessment and wellness coaching process via the COLLAGE 360 program translated into sample older adults sensing that they live in a more supportive environment when compared with elders not receiving any wellness coaching. In addition, the older adults had positive responses in the areas of mood and life satisfaction. Strategies to improve health and well being need an extended focus beyond the older adult‘s medical conditions and consider psychological, spiritual and social needs with personal preferences being paramount. These issues are foundational to a person- centered, health promotion approach needed among older adults.

Do not miss the opportunity.

 

The Coming Decline of Hospitals and Implications for Our Strategic Plan

An important article in the New York Times highlights the the ongoing reduction of hospital admissions.

Consider this: What year saw the maximum number of hospitalizations in the United States? The answer is 1981.

That might surprise you. That year, there were over 39 million hospitalizations — 171 admissions per 1,000 Americans. Thirty-five years later, the population has increased by 40 percent, but hospitalizations have decreased by more than 10 percent. There is now a lower rate of hospitalizations than in 1946. As a result, the number of hospitals has declined to 5,534 this year from 6,933 in 1981.

In addition to the impact of increasing infection risks:

The number of hospitals is also declining because more complex care can safely and effectively be provided elsewhere, and that’s good news.

When [the writer] was training to become an oncologist, most chemotherapy was administered in the hospital. Now much better anti-nausea medications and more tolerable oral instead of intravenous treatments have made a hospital admission for chemotherapy unusual. Similarly, hip and knee replacements once required days in the hospital; many can now be done overnight in ambulatory surgical centers. Births outside of hospitals are also increasing, as more women have babies at home or at birthing centers.

Studies have shown that patients with heart failure, pneumonia and some serious infections can be given intravenous antibiotics and other hospital-level treatments at home by visiting nurses. These “hospital at home” programs usually lead to more rapid recoveries, at a lower cost.

This has huge implications for the system as a whole.

As these trends accelerate, many of today’s hospitals will downsize, merge or close. Others will convert to doctors’ offices or outpatient clinics. Those that remain will be devoted to emergency rooms, high-tech services for premature babies, patients requiring brain surgery and organ transplants, and the like. Meanwhile, the nearly one billion annual visits to physicians’ offices, imaging facilities, surgical centers, urgent-care centers and “doc in the box” clinics will grow.

It also has huge implications for our already well-advanced planning for implementation of our strategic goals with respect to health care at Collington.  For example:

It will become possible for more and more of us to be treated for more contiditions as outpatients.

Our skilled nursing units will have new uses as lower levels of care during treatment are appropriate.

Potential medical system partners will become even more interested in Collington as “off-site partners.”

The need for focused research on the impact of these changes will be greater, making the appeal of a research friendly partner even greater.

Integration of our holistic services with broader service networks will become crucial and practical.

In other words, we are moving toward “modern gerontology” at just the point that other systems will need our partnership.

Stay tuned.

Champion Trees, Champion Residents

By Alice Nicolson

Last spring many of us were thrilled to find that Collington almost had a county Champion tree in our woods – almost, because although the tree is about 200’ behind unit 5004, it is just outside our property line in the adjoining county Regent Forest Park. The tree came to our attention in 2016 because neighbors asked Davey Tree Company to clear the woodland behind their homes. The Davey arborist noticed the big tree, misidentified it as an ash, and recommended that it be treated against Emerald Ash Borer infestation (a recently arrived pest which is killing ash trees all over the country). Jane Engle contacted her friend Mike Ellis, a Prince George’s park ranger, and asked him to come over and check out this large ash since it might be a county record holder. Mike came, determined that the tree was a mockernut hickory, not an ash (so definitely not needing protection against the EAB!), took its measurements, found its location was just outside Collington property (alas!), and determined that it was indeed a Champion tree for the county. Jane was credited with nominating it (and she and Mike co-nominated two other county champions in other parks). Jane and Mike did some other tree hunting in the neighboring woodland and found one other likely candidate, but had not measured it at the time. 

tree1Pfund, Nicolson and Engle with Mockernut

This week Mike Ellis and his supervisor, Chris Garrett, came over to meet with Ken Burton, Jane’s husband, to have another look at the Mockernut and to relocate and measure the other large tree. (Kyle Olsen and I came along as well). The tree is located several hundred feet downstream from where the trail behind 5110 goes into the swampy woods and meets the stream (Bald Hill Branch) at the white bucket marker. It also is not on Collington’s property, being across the stream where the beaver was very active earlier this winter, in Enterprise Park. However, it is easily seen from our side. Chris and Mike waded across the stream (I clambered across on fallen tree trunks) determined that the tree was a bitternut hickory, measured it and checked the current record listing for that species – and we have yet another county Champion  tree not quite on Collington land!

tree2Bitternut with sign

Chris and Mike placed plaques designating both champion trees on stakes at the foot of the trees, facing Collington viewers. Both trees remind us of Jane Engle, whose love for trees inspires all who worked with her.  If you walk the woodland trail behind the 5000’s, look for the new sign there and, if you are nimble, ramble down our side of the stream and see if you can spot the big tree just across the water!