Category Archives: Collingtonian

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Collingtonian Article on our “Pre-History” Raises Questions about Next Steps

Occasionally, this blog draws attention to articles in our sister publication, the Collingtonian. Peggy Latimer’s piece in the January 2018 issue is deserving of such focus. The piece, tells the history of slaves here at Collington, to the minimal extent that it can be reconstructed from wills and other documents. The story is particular present, because of the graves up on the hill, including one of Basil Warring, who had “inherited” ten slaves from his father.

slave

It is, of course, deeply shaming for a white person to read, and I think Peggy gets just the right combination of factual clarity and respectful perspective:

Marsham’s 1730 will listed them. All but one, however, were identified only by first name [spelling and punctuation through- out are as written in the original documents]: “One Negro Man named Caceour One Negro Man named Hercules one Negro Man named George One Negro Woman named Moll One Mulatto Boy named Charles One Mulatto boy called Robin One Negro Boy named Will Bulger One Mulatto Girl named Sarah One Mulatto Girl named Cate one Negro girl named Lucy and their Increase”

Peggy notes at the end, “With much research, we may be able to learn more of the history of these people. At the very least, shouldn’t we be honoring those enslaved persons who lived and labored on the land where we all now reside?” At the very minimum we should find public ways to recognize and honor that we enjoy the legacy of the labor of their forced and denied lives. Without in any way suggesting equivalence, the need to remember and honor reminds me that a few years ago, I went with my Polish Holocaust surviving aunt to a gymnasium (high school) in Mainz Germany, and for our visit, as part of a larger group, they had put up a mounted display of The Holocaust in Mainz, including a map showing locations.

maint4

Here is a photo of my aunt with some of the display. The kids were deeply respectful and attentive.

Surely we can try to do as much.

Indeed, there must be much else that we could do, that not only reminds of the past, but steers us for the future in these apparently anti-historical times.

Washington Post obituary of Warren Unna

Below is the Washington Post Obituary for Warren Unna:

Warren Unna, journalist and Post bureau chief in India, dies at 93

Warren Unna, a Washington Post correspondent in India who later became Washington correspondent for the Statesman, an English-language newspaper based in Kolkata, died Feb. 9 at a retirement community in Mitchellville, Md. He was 93.

The cause was congestive heart failure, said a friend, Marea Hatziolos Grant.

Mr. Unna covered national news after joining The Post in 1952. His aspirations were to cover South Asia, where he had served with the Army during World War II.

In lieu of a Post bureau there, Mr. Unna made a specialty of writing about Asian affairs from Washington by cultivating sources at embassies and international organizations.

Mr. Unna was bureau chief in New Delhi from 1965 to 1967, then returned to cover national affairs in Washington. He was one of many journalists whose names appeared on President Richard M. Nixon’s enemies list in the early 1970s, presumably for his reporting on the Vietnam War for The Post and for a short-lived public television program, “Newsroom.”

He joined the Statesman in the early 1970s and remained with that publication for approximately the next two decades. He also contributed to other publications.

Warren Walter Unna was born in San Francisco on Sept. 14, 1923. He graduated in 1943 from the University of California at Berkeley with a degree in international relations. He worked at the San Francisco Chronicle before coming to The Post.

In the late 1950s, he traveled widely as an Institute of Current World Affairs fellow, for which he studied the Non-Aligned Movement countries during the Cold War.

He wrote a memoir, “Letters From America” (1994), and in retirement did consulting for the Westinghouse and McClatchy media companies. He was a member of the Metropolitan Club in Washington.

His marriage to Louise Thompson was annulled. Survivors include a stepsister.

(Copyright Washington Post 2017)

This website has commissioned a more detailed appreciation, which we look forward to publishing in the future.

In the interim, readers may find interesting this article from the Collingtonian of March 2012.

Unna Relates His Experiences in Asia

The March 21 guest speaker was no guest at all, but 12-year (almost) Collingtonian Warren Unna, who spoke of his experiences with celebrities from presidents to foreign heads of state while he was a newspaper reporter.

Warren graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and rst worked for the San Francisco Chronicle. The Institute of Current World Affairs gave him the opportunity to travel- study around the world for a year. He concentrated on how countries achieved neutrality.

He then obtained employment at the Wash- ington Post because, he said, the chronicle’s management didn’t want to pay the Newspaper Guild’s required salary for a senior reporter. For the Post, he primarily covered Asia. Warren rattled off a list of famous people whom he had met, beginning with then past-president Herbert Hoover who was chairing the Hoover Commis- sion for President Dwight Eisenhower. He found Hoover quite pleasant to deal with.

Not so Ike, who did not seem to like doing press conferences and kept the press at bay when he traveled. On the other hand, a John Kennedy press conference was “just a joy.” Lyn- don Johnson, who believed that “every man had his price,” was the best politician of the presi- dents, he thought. “He got his votes,” Warren said

Warren attributed his success in conducting interviews to being friendly and listening to the person being interviewed. It is also important to sit so as to make eye contact, he said. In Indonesia, he managed to obtain a difficult interview by learning that it was the local custom to not turn away any visitor who arrived in the late afternoon. In his travels about Asia, Warren recounted many experiences and listed the many prominent people he met: Indian Prime Minister Jawaharial Nehru who answered 17 questions for him, thereby generating two major stories with Warren’s byline; the King of Bhutan who sought advice on educating his son; an Indian health minister who walked briskly back and forth in a garden while he trailed her trying to take notes; President Lee Kuan Yew of the Republic of Singapore with whom he argued about the Viet Nam War; the daughter of a Japanese Prime Minister for whom a gift of stockings got him an interview and a nice meal in a restaurant; the wife of the president of South Korea who tried to nd eligible ladies for him to marry; Madame Chiang Kai-shek whom he watched squirm as her support from the “China Lobby” in America dried- up and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who rejected his questions.

Of particular interest to residents was his accompanying G. Mennen “Soapy” Williams, then assistant secretary of state for African Affairs, on a whirlwind tour of 16 countries in 31 days for President Kennedy. In Addis Abbaba, Ethiopia, he met and lunched with Collingtonians Bill and Nancy McGhee, who were then stationed there. He apologized to them (they were in the audience) for impertinently asking if they “always ate that well.”

(Copyright Collington Residents Association 2012)

The Halloween Diorama in the Dining Room

George Newman writes: You may have wondered who’s responsible for the Halloween diorama in the dining room.   It’s Denise Bunting.  The story of how the display came to be is in the November Collingtonian, coming soon.

village-2_fotor

There She Is . . . The Real Ms. America

The new issue of the Collingtonian, the monthly resident publication at our retirement community, Collington, includes a wonderful article about how the US got to its unmatched position in women’s sport.

It is an interview with Joan Hult, below, who played a pivotal role in making that happen, and her interview provides some powerful lessons about how societies change.  Read the whole article, and share with anyone who cares about any of these issues.

hult

The article describes how it all got started:

Joan’s association with the U.S. Olympic Committee began in the 1960s, when “I went to them and I said, ‘You guys are never winning in women’s sports and that’s because we don’t teach women to play competitively.’ I said, ‘I can give you 10 women that are right now ready to win.’”

This was no idle boast. Since 1958, Joan had been at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn., where she became chair of the women’s physical education department, coached
every women’s sport except gymnastics and founded the women’s intercollegiate sports program.

There was political savy too.

Working with Birch Bayh, a senator from her home state of Indiana, she helped bring about the passage of Title IX, an amendment to the Civil Rights Act.

Title IX is often described as promoting equality of men’s and women’s sports programs. But Joan pointed out that it wasn’t that simple. “We were smarter than that,” she said. Facing a predominantly male Congress and sports establishment, Title IX’s backers were careful to keep its language as neutral as possible. She recalled that she and Bayh “worked together quite well, although it’s really his wife that kind of talked him into taking this to Congress. He was smart enough to not have a bunch of women” as prominent advocates, so Joan and others worked behind the scenes.

The original Title IX never mentioned sports. It simply guaranteed equal access to educational opportunity. (Legislation in 1988 mandated gender equality in collegiate athletic scholarships.)

And so it gets to this (photos on google).

By the way, Joan’s book, A Century of Women’s Basketball: From Frailty to the Final Four, published in 1991, is on Amazon.

The Collington Olympic Medalist — Frederick Douglass Pollard Jr.

Someone recently asked if there was a Collington Olympian.  Turns out that there was one, of whom we can be proud in so many ways that go beyond and enhance the sport achievement itself.

As George Newman’s article in the February 2015 Collingtonian began:

The 1936 Berlin Olympics are justly famous for the four gold medals won by Jesse Owens, the African-American sprinter whose performance gave the lie to Adolf Hitler’s theory of a Nordic master race. But Owens was not the only African-American to win a medal in Berlin. As Collington celebrates Black History Month, it’s fitting to note that one of Owens’s team- mates, Frederick Douglass Pollard Jr., spent the last years of his life in our Creighton Center.

Pollard, who was known as Fritz, was fully Owens’s equal, said Pollard’s son, Fritz Pollard III, who lives in Germantown, Md., “My father said he used to beat Jesse in the 100 [meter sprint] but he thought the 100 was boring,” the son said in an interview. “He really liked the hurdles.”

Indeed, his history is recalled in a NYT article about a medalists Reunion in 1999.

They gathered on the steps of the Capitol, more than 100 American Olympians — from Fred Pollard, who has spent a lifetime describing how it felt to be a black man confronting Adolf Hitler at Berlin’s 1936 Games, to Beth Botsford, a 16-year-old double gold medal winner in 1996 who was late for today’s Olympic Day festivities because she would not miss her morning swim practice.

In the early afternoon, Pollard told Jesse Owens stories and Conner explained how he first got interested in the Olympics with an eighth-grade term paper on the 1936 Games. Botsford acknowledged it was humbling to be a part of such a group.

Do read the full Collingtonian article, and remember that we now have quite a Collingtonian archive here, going back to late 2001.  Thanks again to Bessie.

Here is the photo of Frederick Douglass Pollard Jr.  We honor him.  He earned his name.

Pollard

By the way, his father was the first African American head coach in the NFL.