Collingtonian Article on our “Pre-History” Raises Questions about Next Steps

Occasionally, this blog draws attention to articles in our sister publication, the Collingtonian. Peggy Latimer’s piece in the January 2018 issue is deserving of such focus. The piece, tells the history of slaves here at Collington, to the minimal extent that it can be reconstructed from wills and other documents. The story is particular present, because of the graves up on the hill, including one of Basil Warring, who had “inherited” ten slaves from his father.

slave

It is, of course, deeply shaming for a white person to read, and I think Peggy gets just the right combination of factual clarity and respectful perspective:

Marsham’s 1730 will listed them. All but one, however, were identified only by first name [spelling and punctuation through- out are as written in the original documents]: “One Negro Man named Caceour One Negro Man named Hercules one Negro Man named George One Negro Woman named Moll One Mulatto Boy named Charles One Mulatto boy called Robin One Negro Boy named Will Bulger One Mulatto Girl named Sarah One Mulatto Girl named Cate one Negro girl named Lucy and their Increase”

Peggy notes at the end, “With much research, we may be able to learn more of the history of these people. At the very least, shouldn’t we be honoring those enslaved persons who lived and labored on the land where we all now reside?” At the very minimum we should find public ways to recognize and honor that we enjoy the legacy of the labor of their forced and denied lives. Without in any way suggesting equivalence, the need to remember and honor reminds me that a few years ago, I went with my Polish Holocaust surviving aunt to a gymnasium (high school) in Mainz Germany, and for our visit, as part of a larger group, they had put up a mounted display of The Holocaust in Mainz, including a map showing locations.

maint4

Here is a photo of my aunt with some of the display. The kids were deeply respectful and attentive.

Surely we can try to do as much.

Indeed, there must be much else that we could do, that not only reminds of the past, but steers us for the future in these apparently anti-historical times.

Volunteer Opportunities

Dave Montgomery has put together a rather comprehensive list of volunteer opportunities both at Collington and in greater Prince George’s County. You can find this list under the Getting Around tab –> Volunteer Opportunities. Or click here to see the page now!

Thanks Dave!

CAPITAL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER GROUNDBREAKING EVENT AT LARGO TOWN CENTER: NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Contributed by Peter Fielding

Last Thursday was both memorable and important for our Collington community.

After a long period of discussion, lasting some ten years, the University of Maryland and our Maryland state agencies have partnered to create a new state of the art Medical Center less than two miles from our Collington campus.

Under the very entertaining and skilled Master of Ceremonies, Charlene Dukes (President, Prince Georges Community College), a dozen speakers had variations on the same themes: partnerships; recognition of local healthcare needs; the politics of money; and the duration of what was called a “spirited negotiation” which was needed to reach ultimate agreement.

Both well-established representatives and those seeking higher office were on the program and most of them spoke: Seamon, Moore, Reece, Chrencik, Hogan, Cardin, Van Hollen, Hoyer, Brown, Davis, Busch, Miller, and Baker.

However, it was the last speaker, The Honorable Rushern L. Baker III, PG County Executive, who had been the major driving force keeping the vision moving forward who spoke for the majority. He was quiet, humble, sincere, and clearly personally moved by the fact that the people of our region will now be better served when the first phase of the Medical Center, and some of the related retail and office developments, come on line within 3 – 4 years. Baker was given a standing ovation by the 450 guests (which included a small contingent from Collington). All the guests were clearly very engaged; lots of animated chatter; lots of handshakes; and quite a lot of hugs.

It was a good day for a future which promises to meet some of Collington’s core health needs.   So very refreshing.

Hospital details when all phases complete:

  • Main Tower: 11 levels; 2 rooftop helipads, 595,744 sq. ft.
  • Acute care licensed beds (private): 205
  • Adult Observation/Short Stay beds: 20
  • ER treatment bays: 45
  • Operating rooms: 8

Core Programs & Specialty Centers:

  • Level II Trauma Center
  • Level III Neonatal Intensive Care
  • Cardiac STEMI/Cardiac Surgery Center
  • Designated Stroke Center
  • Cancer Program
  • Critical Care Medicine
  • Emergency Services
  • Neurosciences
  • Orthopedics
  • Women’s Services

Sounds of Beethoven in the Ivy Room

 

 

Tuesday, October 10, residents were treated to duo delights performed by our University of Maryland student intern residents, cellist Samantha Flores and clarinetist Matt Rynes.  They serenaded over 30 residents for about 30 minutes with 2 Beethoven duets.  Everybody loved to hear them, and with good reason.  Read at the bottom of this post for more information on what the two will be up to here in the next few months.

Matt has played the clarinet for about 15 years and is studying for a PhD in Clarinet Performance, and Samantha is a 2nd year Masters student in Cello Performance.  They will be here until next summer but meantime have much planned for our residents.

We can look forward to more short performances in the Ivy Room by them as well as other University of Maryland music students.  Later in October Samantha and Matt are planning a larger and longer performance in the Auditorium.  This will include other musicians (students as well as faculty and professionals) and last about an hour.  Keep your eyes open for flyers and news in the Courier.  These longer performances will also become a more regular feature.

Both Samantha and Matt are also available for music lessons in clarinet, cello and beginner string instruments.   A music reading class, lectures and workshops are also on the horizon.  Clearly both these talented musicians have great affection for Collington and our residents and we reciprocate.

New Tips on Shopping Around Collington

Joe Howard and others have put up a wonderful collection of resources for shopping.

It should be emphasized that this is for informational purposes only.  No endorsement should be implied.

Here is the list.

It is also reachable from the “getting around” tab on the top menu.

Enjoy