Category Archives: Health Care

CAPITAL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER GROUNDBREAKING EVENT AT LARGO TOWN CENTER: NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Contributed by Peter Fielding

Last Thursday was both memorable and important for our Collington community.

After a long period of discussion, lasting some ten years, the University of Maryland and our Maryland state agencies have partnered to create a new state of the art Medical Center less than two miles from our Collington campus.

Under the very entertaining and skilled Master of Ceremonies, Charlene Dukes (President, Prince Georges Community College), a dozen speakers had variations on the same themes: partnerships; recognition of local healthcare needs; the politics of money; and the duration of what was called a “spirited negotiation” which was needed to reach ultimate agreement.

Both well-established representatives and those seeking higher office were on the program and most of them spoke: Seamon, Moore, Reece, Chrencik, Hogan, Cardin, Van Hollen, Hoyer, Brown, Davis, Busch, Miller, and Baker.

However, it was the last speaker, The Honorable Rushern L. Baker III, PG County Executive, who had been the major driving force keeping the vision moving forward who spoke for the majority. He was quiet, humble, sincere, and clearly personally moved by the fact that the people of our region will now be better served when the first phase of the Medical Center, and some of the related retail and office developments, come on line within 3 – 4 years. Baker was given a standing ovation by the 450 guests (which included a small contingent from Collington). All the guests were clearly very engaged; lots of animated chatter; lots of handshakes; and quite a lot of hugs.

It was a good day for a future which promises to meet some of Collington’s core health needs.   So very refreshing.

Hospital details when all phases complete:

  • Main Tower: 11 levels; 2 rooftop helipads, 595,744 sq. ft.
  • Acute care licensed beds (private): 205
  • Adult Observation/Short Stay beds: 20
  • ER treatment bays: 45
  • Operating rooms: 8

Core Programs & Specialty Centers:

  • Level II Trauma Center
  • Level III Neonatal Intensive Care
  • Cardiac STEMI/Cardiac Surgery Center
  • Designated Stroke Center
  • Cancer Program
  • Critical Care Medicine
  • Emergency Services
  • Neurosciences
  • Orthopedics
  • Women’s Services

Important Medical Information

contributed by Peter Fielding, Chair of the Health Services Committee

As reported by the Washington Post, a group of 11 national medical associations, including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, have issued a statement that now considers high blood pressure as a reading of 130 over 80, down from 140 over 80.

The Post notes that this change means that almost half (46%) of US adults, many under 45 years old, will now be considered hypertensive.    Bloomberg News adds the information that the new levels are the result of a three year review of over a thousand studies.

Although the increase in risk for people above the new limit is small (how small is not specified in the article), this is a topic worth discussing with your doctor.

Know Our Health Center

Did you know that our Health Center has five neighborhoods?  What distinguishes one from another? Ashley Walters, our Director of Health Services, provides the answers! Click here for the information.

And now the video — Modern Gerontology By Michelle Bellantoni of Hopkins Presented at Collington

So, here it is:

For the slides, go here.

For Peter Fielding’s summary, go here.

I hope this changes both our personal health thinking, and the way our community plans and deploys health care.  The two, of course, will go together.  That’s the whole point of the strategic plan.

 

The Slides From the Brilliant Presentation on Modern Gerontology

Here are the full slides from the presentation by Dr. Bellantoni: Aging and Health Care.

Just as a teaser, here is one slide.

Whatever path we take, let’s look back at this in five years and say, this way of thinking is what has inspired us.

 

Aging and Health Care 9.21.003