Category Archives: Events

By No Means the Dog Days: First Class Entertainment at Collington in Early August

contributed by Marian Fuchs

In the first two weeks of August 2018, Collington residents were treated to all kinds of great entertainment.

On one afternoon and two evenings we were treated to a evening of total pleasure:  Summer’s Lease:  Songs, Sonnets and Scenes from the Bard, put on by a cast of dozens from the Drama Committee.  Below are Musical Director, Marilyn Haskel, and Director Tim Sabin, in front of the charming set built by Grant Bagley and Don Collins.

For the production program, including the words of the songs and sonnets, and a background piece by Tim Sabin, click here.

The following week, Glen Johnson introduced the community to one of his former students, Chip Reid, a national correspondent for CBS News, speaking on From Obama to Trump:  How Life has Changed for Political Reporters.  This telegenic and fluent speaker charmed his packed audience, and aroused a series of interesting questions that kept us for much longer than expected.

There were two excellent and very different concerts.   In the Sunday afternoon series, the audience enjoyed listening to the Transatlantic Duo of Alexander Paperney (balalaika) and Vladimir Friedman (guitar and vocals).   Their music varied from Mozart and Bizet to Russian folk music, with tango music from Brazil in between.

Sponsored by our two departing summer interns, there was a concert in the short Beethoven series given by some highly talented young musicians from U Maryland.  It was given to a packed house on a Friday afternoon.

Above are Molly Jones, Cello, Andrew Welch, Piano, and guest player, Lewis Gilmore on Clarinet.   The three together played a Brahms trio;  Molly and Andrew together gave us some delightful variations by Beethoven on a tune written by Handel, and finally a Sonata for cello and piano by the same composer.

The young woman in black on the right was introduced only as “Ria”, and is one of the two replacement music interns Collington will be hosting from September.

Residents who braved to off-and-on-again rain one Saturday got to enjoy the Doxoe jazz music of the Kollington Kats, while sipping cocktails in the courtyard or Clocktower.  Below a picture of some of the Kats swinging at an earlier gig.

Successful Shakespeare Performances

Below you the see the full cast of the recent “Summer’s Lease” presentation of “Songs, Sonnets and Scenes” from Shakespeare from the Drama Group.  (Photo by George Newman.)

ensemble

They all look happy, as well they should.

The hard work, enthusiasm, and simple joy shone through all the performances.  They had a lot of fun

It would be unfair to focus on any particular performers.  Rather it should be noted that Director Tim Sabin’s work on intent and discernment showed through all the way.

More, please!

The Jacob Kijne Know Your Neighbor

Here is Jacob’s impressive “know your neighbor” talk from last Tuesday night.

Enjoy.  Hopefully it will stimulate others to share their stories.

Our Intergenerational Music Program Featured as National Cutting Edge. Newspaper and TV

Collington is now the Poster Child for Intergenerational programs!

Samantha Flores and Collington are the featured story (with photo of our auditorium) in The New York Times reporing on a newly issued report on inter generation initiatives for seniors.  The story begins.

When Samantha Flores wasn’t taking classes at the University of Maryland for her master’s degree in cello performance this past academic year, she could often be found hanging out with a bunch of 80-somethings. Ms. Flores, 28, along with another music student, was participating in a new artists-in-residence program at Collington, a nonprofit retirement community in Mitchellville, Md.

As the article reported:

Marilyn Haskel, a 72-year-old resident of Collington involved in selecting the students, said the young people often invited fellow music students to practice on the grounds, resulting in pop-up concerts. With no family nearby, Ms. Haskel said, “it was delightful for me to sit down and have conversations about their careers and what they’re planning.”

When residents learned that Ms. Flores didn’t have a car, they often drove her to campus. Ms. Flores struck up close friendships with many of the residents, including one she met in September who had recently been given a brain cancer diagnosis.

“We bonded over Bach,” she said, engaging in lengthy conversations about him. When the man died in February, Ms. Flores played a piece he had requested at his funeral: Bach’s “Sarabande: Suite for Solo Cello No. 5 in C Minor.”

“I promised I wouldn’t cry, but you can’t help that,” she said. “It was a very emotional moment.”

The trigger for the article is a new report from Generations United and the Eisner Foundation survey of 180 intergenerational programs.

That report itself cites a Harris Poll that found:

[P]lenty of support for programs that bring diverse age groups together to fend off loneliness. Ninety-two percent of Americans believe intergenerational activities can help reduce loneliness across all ages.

Moreover,

A strong majority of Americans (94 percent) agree that older people have skills or talents that can help address a child’s/youth’s needs and 89 percent believe the same about children and youth addressing the needs of elders. More than four in ve Americans also say if they (85 percent) or a loved one (86 percent) needed care services, they would prefer a care setting with opportunities for intergenerational contact rather than one with a single age group. Americans were also clear that age segregation is harmful, finding that almost three quarters (74 percent) agree that “programs and facilities that separately serve different age groups prevent children/youth and older adults from benefitting from each other’s skills and talents.

Given all that is now happening in this field, way beyond music, we will need to keep innovatintg to stay in the lead — another major task for our strategic planning process.  Indeed, onsite child care was an idea that came up frequently in the process.

P.S.  One little thing I would like the photo committee to do is take on making a set of before and after photos of our residents, showing the huge impact grandchildren visits have on us.

P.P.S.  The TV version is on WJLA, here.

 

 

Memorial Day Weekend – The Collington Way

By Marian Fuchs and Lois Brown

regatta
There was more wind this year and more action in the five-boat regatta on the Collington Lake on the Saturday of Memorial Weekend 2018.  The crowd enthusiastically cheered or groaned as the sturdy little boats made their rounds. Meanwhile, hamburgers, hotdogs, and trimmings were available to bolster spectators’ energies.  Cluster 1000’s boat, the Priscilla, skippered by Dick Garrison, came in first.  He received the trophy that evening at the Commodore’s Ball.
The Ball was to have started with cocktails and canapes in the courtyard, but fearing the predicted downpours (which in fact never came), the goodies were on offer in the Clocktower and corridors instead.  Much-praised raw oysters, shrimp, and other offerings were enjoyed to the background of the Kollington Katz doing their thing.  Their ‘thing’ is getting better and better with every performance — some attendees couldn’t resist the chance to start dancing early.
Katz
Ball-goers moved to the auditorium for a scallops appetizer, lobster-tail and steak entree, and a hand-made fruit tart dessert.   Wine was flowing, inhibitions lowering, and the eight Big Band players attracted dancers right away.   The best dancers of the night were by no means the youngest, but were certainly the most fun to watch. A very good start to the Memorial Weekend was had by all, including the foot-tapping servers!
dancers
As Memorial Day approached Collington became more serious. Sunday afternoon, Jessica Bateman on flute and Sherry Anaveson on piano presented their program “A Tempo.” The audience was moved by the patriotic, spiritual, and classical music. During “The Armed Forces Salute” Ms. Bateman gave her piccolo a real work out. The audience showed their appreciation as they stood for their branch of service.

Memorial Day brought Collington’s own unique service. Mary Ann Pellerin, in honor of her mother, has constructed our own “Memorial Wall” of remembrance. Going back to 1988, by year, the names of those late Collingtonians are written with their date of death.


The service included prayers and music and concluded with the naming out loud of Collingtonians who passed from January 2017 through May 2018. The audience then added other loved ones to the recital. Taps was played and the service concluded with a benediction.

Flag
The weekend ended on a high note with a Memorial Day brunch prepared and served by our dedicated culinary staff and enjoyed by residents, friends, and family.