Category Archives: Events

Christmas Comes to Collington!

Contributed by Marian Fuchs

All over campus signs of the holiday season are proliferating.  There’s obviously much more to come:

  • a Dickens Dinner at the weekend
  • a Holiday Party on the 12th
  • a service on Christmas Eve and a Breakfast on the day
  • and a dinner-dance on New Year’s Eve.

But just today, Monday December 4, we had the trimming of the giant tree in the Clocktower.  Below you see some of the trimmers, and the results of their trimming.  If you weren’t there, you missed some great petit fours and hot chocolate!

 

 

Good News!

By Marian Fuchs

It’s always fun to meet the children of fellow-residents.  Mostly we see them in the dining room for weekend meals.  But sometimes we get to hear from them directly, and that’s even better.   Later this week we’re going to have the chance to hear from the Florini’s two daughters, both of whom are following illustrious careers.   Their talk title suggests that we’re going to hear something positive — just what we need right around now!   sisters3a

 

Marketing Office Invite — Come to their Christmas Event Next Week!

We residents have been invited to join a group of possible future neighbors at a Marketing Event on Tuesday, December 5 from noon to 3:00 pm.
In addition to meeting the visitors, you’ll be able to enjoy:
  • Finger food in the Clocktower
  • Carriage rides throughout the campus
  • Singing by the Chesapeake Choral in the auditorium from 1:30 – 2:30 pm.
 Marketing Invitation

HEROES and Me

Since arriving at Collington this May, Nancy and I have participated in so many old and new pleasures.  Book clubs, memoir writing, tai chi, yoga, balance and beyond classes fill the days.  Plus innumerable volunteer opportunities allow us to expand beyond ourselves.  Growth is inevitable.  Nancy has learned all about haunted houses and how to become the scariest of Collington witches.  And I have become immersed in the theater.  Let me explain.

After attending a few drama committee meetings, I volunteered to help out with the upcoming play, HEROES.  Sometime after rehearsals started I was asked to help the assistant director;  she needed a prop lady.  My journey began by attending rehearsals and moving a few things around.

Experiencing the production of HEROES was a gift.  Watching 3 wonderful neighbors act like 3 confused old men in the manner of vaudeville and observing amusingly stealthy Sister Madeleine plague the men can hardly be called work. Watching the director and assistant director ply their trade will never allow me to see live theater again in the same way.  The inventiveness of the lights and scenery man just plain appealed to my engineering self.  The chanteuse and her accompanist could do no wrong.

3 men and flag

 

Contributing in my own small way — where to place a chair, fetch water, cue actors when to go on stage, tape ear mikes in place, push the button on the video recorder or even teach geese the correct way to fly — made the experience one that I want to take on again and again.

My biggest joy was the camaraderie and constant laughter to the very last bow.  Thank you one and all.

Still-life photography at Collington

contributed by David Montgomery

frog8

Still life has been an accepted approach in painting for many years. Subtle variations within the approach included attempts at symbolism; e.g., “vanitas still life” painting took on a life of its own. (During the 16th and 17th centuries in Flanders and the Netherlands, skulls, watches, and musical instruments evoked thoughts of brevity and the ephemeral nature of life.)

Photographic still life is relatively uncommon, but a photography exhibit entitled “Calm Life” is now hanging in the library corridor, scheduled to remain through December. It presents still life for its own sake. It should be pleasing as a combination of form and color, and any symbolism is accidental.

Still life is an attractive approach within photography for some of the same reasons it is attractive in painting, in particular, the ability to control lighting and placement. Photography, however, adds degrees of freedom to the art form. For one, we can combine elements in the computer. This ability is critical for some depictions, e.g., the frog in one picture would not have cooperated in placing additional elements around it. Digital photography further allows manipulation of the image through artistic effects. Control of light extends beyond the initial position of lights; the degree of lightness and darkness can be varied after the fact. As you review the current show, note that much of the work includes an emphasis on background and the position of shadows can be critical.