Pickleball: A Game for all AGES

Contributed by Dorothy Yuan

When we first arrived in Collington we frequently utilized the well-maintained tennis court.  However after one season my husband decided to stop playing for fear of falling while trying to return my flying balls.  Now I was left with the backboard for a partner.  Salvation came in the person of Ann Marie Rahn, who instigated the idea of getting the community to play pickleball.  She lowered the nets slightly, used tape to demarcate new boundary lines and convinced old and new players to come and try.  Now we routinely have at least four to six players and sometimes eight, enough to occupy both courts.  We are also extremely lucky to have among our residents an expert player, Norma Taylor.  She made sure that we understood the rules but, more importantly, she is a patient tutor, constantly showing us the right strokes.  Hopefully our courts will soon be marked more permanently.  But the boundary lines for tennis will remain.

Hope more of you will be willing to come and play.  Times of assembly will always be posted in the Courier.

Composting! A new green venture on campus!

Contributed by Marian Fuchs

A small group of entrepreneurial residents have got together to start a new eco-project at Collington.  All of us who drink tea or coffee have the chance to recycle our old grounds and tea bags in the Collington compost project, along with fruit rinds, vegetable waste, dead plant leaves and the like.

The implementing team consists of Don Peterson and an ad-hoc committee of four:  Nini Almy, Liz Barbehenn, Shirley Denham and Marilyn Meek.    Below are Don and Nini — two of the instigators!

Without much fanfare, the group have set up a series of seven compost bins – four by the greenhouse and raised beds (pictured above), the other three at the Hilltop Gardens.  Totally compostable bags are available in the greenhouse, up at the Gardens and in the Country Store.

If you haven’t already started recycling, here are the compost instructions – copied on every bin.

Near the compost bins is a big trash can, where you can contribute the things that should not be composted, as shown below.

It will take about a year for the items in the bins to turn into good, rich, compost that Collington gardeners can use in 2019 to improve the soil in which they will be growing their herbs, vegetables and flowers.  What a win-win project!