Author Archives: jbfreeman40

Christmas Comes to Collington!

Contributed by Marian Fuchs

All over campus signs of the holiday season are proliferating.  There’s obviously much more to come:

  • a Dickens Dinner at the weekend
  • a Holiday Party on the 12th
  • a service on Christmas Eve and a Breakfast on the day
  • and a dinner-dance on New Year’s Eve.

But just today, Monday December 4, we had the trimming of the giant tree in the Clocktower.  Below you see some of the trimmers, and the results of their trimming.  If you weren’t there, you missed some great petit fours and hot chocolate!

 

 

CAPITAL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER GROUNDBREAKING EVENT AT LARGO TOWN CENTER: NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Contributed by Peter Fielding

Last Thursday was both memorable and important for our Collington community.

After a long period of discussion, lasting some ten years, the University of Maryland and our Maryland state agencies have partnered to create a new state of the art Medical Center less than two miles from our Collington campus.

Under the very entertaining and skilled Master of Ceremonies, Charlene Dukes (President, Prince Georges Community College), a dozen speakers had variations on the same themes: partnerships; recognition of local healthcare needs; the politics of money; and the duration of what was called a “spirited negotiation” which was needed to reach ultimate agreement.

Both well-established representatives and those seeking higher office were on the program and most of them spoke: Seamon, Moore, Reece, Chrencik, Hogan, Cardin, Van Hollen, Hoyer, Brown, Davis, Busch, Miller, and Baker.

However, it was the last speaker, The Honorable Rushern L. Baker III, PG County Executive, who had been the major driving force keeping the vision moving forward who spoke for the majority. He was quiet, humble, sincere, and clearly personally moved by the fact that the people of our region will now be better served when the first phase of the Medical Center, and some of the related retail and office developments, come on line within 3 – 4 years. Baker was given a standing ovation by the 450 guests (which included a small contingent from Collington). All the guests were clearly very engaged; lots of animated chatter; lots of handshakes; and quite a lot of hugs.

It was a good day for a future which promises to meet some of Collington’s core health needs.   So very refreshing.

Hospital details when all phases complete:

  • Main Tower: 11 levels; 2 rooftop helipads, 595,744 sq. ft.
  • Acute care licensed beds (private): 205
  • Adult Observation/Short Stay beds: 20
  • ER treatment bays: 45
  • Operating rooms: 8

Core Programs & Specialty Centers:

  • Level II Trauma Center
  • Level III Neonatal Intensive Care
  • Cardiac STEMI/Cardiac Surgery Center
  • Designated Stroke Center
  • Cancer Program
  • Critical Care Medicine
  • Emergency Services
  • Neurosciences
  • Orthopedics
  • Women’s Services

A Difficult and Courageous Testament

The personal testament that appears below is probably not of the kind that we would ordinarily publish on our website.  However, given the urgency of the topic’s moment, the courage of those coming forward and the importance of our national exploration, we are sharing it with admiration for the author’s strength.

The piece is authored by Collington resident Jane Engle, for whom making her name public is itself an important statement.

I wish to take advantage of this moment in history to share briefly a few stories of sexual harassment and abuse from my life. I do so because it is healing for me to write these stories and, even more so, to make them public. I do so in the hope that other residents and those who read this website will also find healing in sharing their stories in whatever venue is appropriate for them. I do so in fear that residents or staff, who are now experiencing similar situations, have remained silent because they fear dire consequences. I hope they find support from all the stories that are being told and the strength to tell the authorities who can help them. What follows involve a family member, a professor, a doctor, a minister and a friend.

A member of my family sexually abused me. I “don’t remember” these events. They are “secrets” in the family. I’ve never told anyone about these events.

A professor during my university studies who was the chairman of my honors thesis sexually abused me over a long period of time. I discovered that he had abused many other students before and after me. The administration knew of his actions, but he continued to teach until many years later when he retired as professor emeritus. He was held in high esteem by the many professional societies he belonged to.

A psychiatrist sexually abused me while I was a student at another university. I saw him at the student health clinic where he was the only doctor. He told me he could help me if I was in analysis with him. First he told me lie on a couch. (This was actually the usual practice in analysis.) Then he said we should have back-to-back hourly sessions. Then he said walks would help me feel more open in the sessions. And then he held my hand during these walks. In his office he told me to undress so that he could help me feel good about my body. Then he felt intimate parts of my body. (This last sentence is so painful to remember and, even more so, to write.) It was almost a decade before I was told and believed that this was most certainly not done to help me and that it was  abuse. I then reported these events to the appropriate professional society.  A committee of psychiatrists listened to our disparate stories, decided that I was not telling the truth, and told the psychiatrist to continue his practice.

A minister sexually harassed an intern in a church where I was also an intern. I found out that he had sexually harassed previous interns as well as a seminary student who was in counseling with him. With overwhelming guilt, the reasons for which are hard to understand today, I told the authorities. The minister continued to serve at the same church during the year long bungled investigation. He told others who were in his care that the events were consensual. A person from the church where he previously had served knew of his behavior, but never said anything because “this would ruin his reputation.” Twenty years later I learned that he had just been retired.

A woman, who had been in a religious order and who is one of my best friends, told me in front of her spouse that she had been raped by a man who was and remains in a religious order. Her companion was horrified and said she had never heard about this even though they had been living together for many years. I’ll never forget her exact words, “This was just one of those things. It happens all the time.”

My stories are not unique. I am quite sure many women and men who read this have had experiences that have been more harmful and possibly even violent. Some will inevitably throw stones at those of us who speak about unspeakable things. We have only our integrity on the line. This being said, I continue to struggle with the “secret” in my family.

We appreciate Jane’s courage in writing this piece, and hope the community can find ways to support her, and surely others in tragically similar situations.

Foreign Affairs Interest Discussion Group

Contributed by Dorothy Yuan

On November 17, 2017 about 20 resident-members of this focus group met to discuss the topic:   “How Governments Should Deal with Inequality”.

The topic was suggested by the Group Chair, Carl Brown.  In preparation for the discussion the group was asked to read two articles from Foreign Affairs:  “What Kills Inequality” by Timur Kuran, and “How Should Governments Address Inequality?”, by Melissa S. Kearney.

 George Newman started the discussion with the provocative quotation from Orwell:  “All animals are equal but some are more equal than others”, a viewpoint that sets the tone for the generally pessimistic view of the group regarding whether government can successfully address inequality.

The outstanding factor, of the many cited by the group, was actually addressed in the book  “What’s the Matter with Kansas” by Thomas Frank.  His book was published in 2006, but remains current in explaining why many  Americans consistently vote against government programs that would benefit them.  It seems that the desire to continue to support their particular affinity group cannot be overcome by events that are clearly against their moral conscience.

On the optimistic side the group suggested that for humanity as a whole, increased globalization may serve to reduce the divide as evidenced by the increase in the percentage of  the middle class in China and India.

A note of thanks was given to Lorrie Rogers for providing easier access to reading materials for these sessions.

Collington Strategic Plan Presentation

A Roadmap for the Future of Our Community, the new Strategic Plan for Collington, was presented at the Community Meeting on Friday, November 17. Marvell Adams, Executive Director, led the presentation with Board members Cindy Medlock, Kay Laughton, Ken Burton, and Sara Case, Chief Financial Officer Justin Reaves, and Resident Association President Pat Howard participating. Marvell emphasized that the Strategic Plan represents the inputs of many residents, staff, and board members who participated in 8 work groups over the last year.

The Strategic Plan includes four broad goals and 17 supporting objectives. The four goals:

  • Deliver Excellence in Health and Wellness
  • Enrich Collington Culture & Stakeholder Engagement
  • Steward Our Resources to Provide Excellence in the Collington Experience
  • Serve Our Broader Community as an Outstanding Leader and Partner

A new Mission Statement was also introduced: Creating community for older adults and all they care about inspired by their vision for purposeful lives. This was accompanied by a new Vision Statement and an affirmation of the Kendal Values and Practices. Implementation and an operational work plan will begin January 2018 focusing first on health and wellness.

A copy of the presentation is available here.

An official detailed publication will be available November 30.