Introducing “The Landing”

We have all been waiting for the opening of “The Landing” with great anticipation.  Indeed we have now received invitations for group tastings in the near future.  So we thought folks might be interested in seeing how our chefs are developing the recipes and learning the techniques to ensure the food is mouthwatering.

Disclaimer:  The videography standard is not nearly up to the demonstrated cooking standard.  This is my first venture into videography and we can all blame Richard Zorza for the loan of his video cam and the accompanying lessons he gave me.

 

 

 

A History of African American Hospitals in the U.S.

By Dr. Bud Gardiner

Join resident Dr. Bud Gardiner on February 15th at 2 pm in the Auditorium for this fascinating program.  Sponsored by the Health Services Committee.

ProvidentHospital

The health of African slaves was an issue concerning slave-holders but there was no organized attention paid to this issue.  In 1832, the Georgia General Assembly established a hospital “for the relief and protection of afflicted and aged Africans”.  Thus, the Georgia Infirmary was built south of Savannah. Over the years approximately 200 hospitals were established for black citizens under the auspices of governments, a variety of charitable organizations and groups of African American citizens and physicians. They were often tied to medical and nursing education. The bulk of them, of course, was in the southern states and had varying lengths of survival. With the impact of economic and social influences, (especially racial integration) only one such hospital remains. Their history provides a fascinating glimpse of an oppressed but resourceful segment of our population.

 

Productive and Active

The theme at Collington for this year’s Black History Month is “Productive and Active.” Arts and crafts are now on display showing many products of being active. The glass cases in the Clock Tower contain work of residents including stained glass and needle point. Other products organized by Delores Hawkins are hung in the auditorium corridor. They include a jigsaw puzzle completed by Ron Hawkins and the picture, Fields to Factory, loaned by the Hawkinses. Students of SAGE classes may recognize work of the teacher, Albert Hurley, whose portraits are in the corridor. Pictures created by resident Madeline Wilson are scheduled for the exhibit. Von Willingham loaned her picture of Martin Luther King, Jr. The general effect of the displays is a demonstration of production contributed by the Collington community.

Artists-in-Residence Featured in the TERP

Collington’s artists-in-residence, Samantha Flores and Matthew Rynes, students at the University of Maryland, were featured in an article in the university’s magazine, the Terp. Included is a picture of Sam and the Collington singers. Click here to see the full article.

A Long Love of Art

The work of Ruth Schrock now on display in the library corridor is distinctive for several reasons. For one, she shows her work in both painting and photography. That her photography is film-based is significant in this day of digital work. The pieces now displayed come from her work while a student, and most of the subjects resulted from course assignments as she majored in fine arts. Painting and photography were favorite media, and both required seeing and interpreting.

The painting “Space Form Puzzle III” was inspired by a particularly interesting tree bark and was part of a three-part series. The first two were totally abstract, and the third evolved into this more representational form. “After Braque” and “After Pollack” came after studies of their work then selecting stylistic elements for interpretation in her own painting. The photographic series “Passages, as Metaphors for Life” resulted from a semester-long study on a singular subject. Doorways, hallways, and windows all speak to the mystery and unknowns we experience as humans. During the 70’s and 80’s she was included in juried exhibitions in Indiana, Michigan, and Virginia.

While Ruth’s career path was circuitous, from early childhood on she enjoyed visual stimulation, long before she knew what “fine arts” meant. She first received a BS in Nursing and spent several years in psychiatric nursing before becoming a “stay at home mom.” It was during that time that she began her art studies. After completion of her fine arts program, she worked as a free-lance photographer for a time, but found long hours in the dark room too isolating. She then found her way into the interior design field, which she has enjoyed for the last 30 years. In her interior design, she sees rooms as giant canvases waiting to be filled with form and color.

Ruth’s show will be up through February.

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