Show of Openings

IMG_1661The Auditorium Corridor now displays photographs by Dave Montgomery in the theme of “Openings.” The shots were selected from Dave’s portfolio mainly to include doors and windows while allowing other “openings” into the display; the manhole sneaks in through the definition of openings. The style of the display diverges from earlier Collington shows by Dave in that this is pure photography, in distinction from the previous Collington displays in which photos were heavily edited (some say manipulated) after the camera shutter clicked.
A curious feature of the photograph scenes is that only one (captured just off Washington’s Dupont Circle) was taken in America. The international selection was not intention; it merely reflects the observation that Dave’s camera is more likely to be out while he travels.
Another observation of the show is that it has been interpreted as a show of architecture, a subject of its own importance. While an observer can interpret any picture in terms of its broad architecture, the intended focus is in the opening.
The show is scheduled to be up until December 15. A contribution from any sales will go to the Residents Association.

Pickleball: A Game for all AGES

Contributed by Dorothy Yuan

When we first arrived in Collington we frequently utilized the well-maintained tennis court.  However after one season my husband decided to stop playing for fear of falling while trying to return my flying balls.  Now I was left with the backboard for a partner.  Salvation came in the person of Ann Marie Rahn, who instigated the idea of getting the community to play pickleball.  She lowered the nets slightly, used tape to demarcate new boundary lines and convinced old and new players to come and try.  Now we routinely have at least four to six players and sometimes eight, enough to occupy both courts.  We are also extremely lucky to have among our residents an expert player, Norma Taylor.  She made sure that we understood the rules but, more importantly, she is a patient tutor, constantly showing us the right strokes.  Hopefully our courts will soon be marked more permanently.  But the boundary lines for tennis will remain.

Hope more of you will be willing to come and play.  Times of assembly will always be posted in the Courier.

Meet Our New Artists in Residence

contributed by Joe Howard
Our new artists in residence from the University of Maryland School of Music are Ieseul Yoen (piano) and Natalie Groom (clarinet). A meet and greet will be held Monday, September 16, at 5 PM in the courtyard.

They have provided the following information about upcoming performances:

Saturday October 19, 11:00 am
Natalie and Ieseul Debut Recital in Collington Auditorium

Monday October 21, 8:00 pm
Natalie DMA Candidacy Recital
Gildenhorn Recital Hall, University of Maryland School of Music

Tuesday December 10, 2:00 pm
Whistling Hens returns to Collington Auditorium to perform more music by women, including two pieces which were partially funded by the Women’s History Committee!

Fun and Laughter at the “Café Noir”

Contributed by Marian Fuchs

Photo by Joyce Koch

The Drama Committee has done it again!  With a star-studded cast of glamorous and dangerous people, some great music, great costumes and wigs, and an audience who couldn’t stop laughing, our fellow residents gave us a gloriously enjoyable evening to remember.

Above you see Marilu Sherer, transformed by her golden hair into the beautiful ingenue;  Tom McCain as the cynical private eye, and an almost unrecognizable Marilyn Haskel as a vamp and a bar owner, and more…

They were joined by Don Zelman as a shady guy from the Middle East, Pat Howard as a tough lady with the most incredible eyelashes, and Peter Fielding, with the right accent for a British Solicitor.

Grant Bagley had three roles, and got badly knifed in the back in one, but was the funniest as a pretty useless colonial Caribbean police inspector.

This was a whodunit, and the audience, sitting around having dinner between scenes, and imbibing from the bar, thanks to Yolanda, was supposed to guess the murderer.  Most of us found the plot too complex to even try – but that couldn’t have mattered less.   What we enjoyed the most was seeing our talented actors ham it up, to hear them sing the lovely songs Marilyn had created, and the chansons sung in the intervals by the one-and-only Marion Henry, whose voice remains as pure as ever.

Below see Grant in his three different roles, and Marion singing while Margaret Bagley plays piano.

It was, altogether a glorious evening to remember and cherish.

 

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Creighton Center and Wellness Center Repositioning

Contributed by Julia Freeman

Megan Barbour, Health Services Administrator and Director of Operations, and Peter Fielding, a resident member of the Collington Board, gave an overview of the current status of the planned repositioning of the Creighton Center and Wellness Center at a general meeting August 19. They head the Health Service Alliance, a planning group created by the Board’s Strategic Planning Committee that is leading the implementation of one key pillar of the Collington Strategic Plan – Health and Wellness. The presentations focused on the Creighton Center.

CEO Ann Gillespie opened the presentation by reading the Collington mission and vision statements. She also noted she breaks down strategic planning into four stages — and in her view, work on the Collington Strategic Plan is between Stage 2 and 3; however, the work of the Health Service Alliance, also at this stage, is moving toward later implementation stages win a few months.

Peter highlighted the input the Health Service Alliance has sought – from architects, expert in industry trends, market analysis, and features desired by residents. He emphasized that residents will continue to have a role as plans are further developed.

Megan highlighted some of the key architectural and functional goals for the revised space. The current Creighton Center space will be reconfigured to accommodate expanded capacity for assisted living, especially in the Potomac  (moderate support assisted living) and Brandywine (light assisted living) neighborhoods. The Arbor (memory support) neighborhood will be downsized by a third. Skilled nursing beds will be reduced. Megan noted that there is less demand and reduced Medicare funding for skilled nursing both locally and nationally.

Justin Reeves, CFO, reviewed the finances needed to accomplish the repositioning. The current estimate for both construction and soft costs is $25 million. He also noted that the Health and Wellness projects were just one component of an overall master plan for Collington. Multiple funding sources will be needed.

This program was recorded and can be found under Collington Publications: Recorded Auditorium Events. The slides may be found under Collington Publications: Community Meeting Presentations.  Another discussion session of the materials presented will be held in the near future. Watch the Courier!