Breakthrough on Collington Healthcare and a Pledge

Sometimes we use this blog sot to update our friends with information that has been shared already with residents, but should also be helpful for those who care about them.  This is one such.

We are now officially moving forward with having MedStar Health taking over our clinic, as the first phase of further changes.  The most important thing about this is that the new system we develop with MedStar will be modern gerontology focused, rather than traditional primary care.  Indeed MedStar has long been operating a geriatric program so we can expect quick changes with their expertise.

Let us hope and plan that as we welcome these new providers to our community, we will start from day one as partners, not only as institution to institution, but also as patient to individual provider.  I once ended my first meeting with an oncologist by saying , “you must tell me how I can help you,” and she replied, “you already have.

What a lovely way to start working together.  Lets start with the same spirit.  With all the work that our health and strategic planning groups and management have done to put this together with just this spirit,  I have great confidence that we will.

 

 

 

Chess Play Begins!

Contributed by Bill LIvely

Nine Collingtonians got together on January 8 and exercised the little gray cells by playing chess. Everyone had a good time. Wow, what deep concentration.

We plan on meeting every Tuesday at 2:00 p.m. in the Landing Lakeview Room.

Come join us.    Bill Lively

Glamerous Collington

Contributed by Marian Fuchs

On New Year’s Eve a select group of residents put on their glad rags, and ate, drank and danced the night away in the Auditorium.  Here are some pictures of the revelers that night, taken by Joyce Koch.

“Oh Little Town of Collington…!”

Contributed by Marian Fuchs

The Collington Singers, pictured below in rehearsal before their final performance, provided two enchanted evenings at Collington this holiday season.

Playing to packed houses both nights,  Marilyn Haskel, the choirmaster, gave the happy audience a delightful mixture of holiday music from different parts of the world, and ranging from serious and spiritual to downright funny.   “Superb,” said one audience member.  And so it was.

There were many stars and soloists.  Among the singers there were Merritt Edner, Eloise Scott (‘Scotti’), Pat Bozeman, and Howard Piggee, whose deep, rich baritone made “Keep Your Lamps” zing with meaning.   Tim Sabin gave an excellent narrative that was illustrated by a range of slides, that included the words of the songs, and illustrations that ranged from sentimentally moving to downright silly,  skillfully administered by Jim Holmes.  Piano music was brilliantly provided by Louise Huddleston (below right), and, towards the end of the program, by our artist in resident, Ria Yang.   A new capella group known to us by Tim as the “Bowie Barbershop Babes”  gave us the  pretty German  “Christmas Tree” carol in English and a moving rendition of “I’ll Be Home for Christmas”.

The program started with a small group of sopranos, chanting softly near the entrance, ( below left) quickly setting the Christmas story tone.

Many songs were new to the audience, but many were old favorites, with a new twist.   We had “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas”, “Oh Little Town”, and the rousing finale  in which the audience was allowed to participate in with the “Twelve Days of a Re-Gifted Christmas” was turned into a morality story against such practice.

In addition to singing stars, there were two instrument soloists.  In the first performance, Steve Woodbury played violin, and on the second, Don Zelman played clarinet, as shown below right, next to a post-performance picture of Marilyn and Tim, still high after the wonderful evening’s fun.

 

Collins Exhibit

Contributed by David Montgomery

fishing

Fishing Village by Yu

Selections from the art collection of Don and Judy Collins are now on display in the auditorium corridor. The works now hung represent about a fifth of all the Collins pieces. Anne Stone selected works for this exhibit.

The Collinses started their collection in the 1970’s. Don gives credit for his art appreciation to courses he took. Their choice of purchases has been based on esthetics; the selection is just what they enjoy. Much of their work comes from Connecticut and New Jersey, where ships and coastal scenes catch their eyes. Purchases have found an emphasis on pieces found at the Mystic Art Festival in Connecticut. Their collection, focusing on contemporary artists, covers all media.

The Collington exhibit emphasizes water colors. Six of the pieces were painted by renowned artist John A. Brunner (1868-1948), a great uncle of Don.

Don and Judy intend to add to their collection, and Mystic will be on their purchase itinerary.